Cyclists also have to be responsible

POOLE, ENGLAND - SEPTEMBER 12:  A Royal Mail rural post box besides a country land near Poole on September 12, 2013 in Dorset, England. The Royal Mail will be privatised in the next few weeks the Government has announced.  (Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images)
POOLE, ENGLAND - SEPTEMBER 12: A Royal Mail rural post box besides a country land near Poole on September 12, 2013 in Dorset, England. The Royal Mail will be privatised in the next few weeks the Government has announced. (Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images)

Sir, – Your reports on the Pedal for Scotland event (Journal and Gazette, 
September 6) and the demand for changes to the law to make things ‘fairer’ for cyclists made interesting reading.

Certainly Linlithgow has traffic problems; the High Street is narrow for a town of this size and many alternative routes around the town are unsuitable for a large volume of traffic.

Which means that all road users need to be considerate of each other and, most importantly, observe the traffic calming measures that are in place.

Cyclists appear to me to be no more virtuous in this than the drivers.

I have lost count of the number of cyclists who have sailed out on pedestrian crossings (two faults for the price of one) in front of me, or deliberately speeded up when I have (safely) pulled out to overtake, or ‘undertaking’ when traffic is stopped, or even running through red lights.

Cyclists are not licensed, nor is there an age restriction for when one might safely take to the road.

Cyclists cannot have it both ways; if cyclists are on the road they should have the same rights as drivers as well as the same responsibilities. –Yours etc.,

K Anderson

by email

Sir, – I have been out of the country for a week to read that cyclists are wishing special consideration 
again.

The representative for Spokes reckons that Linlithgow High Street is a nightmare for bikes.

I use my bike all the time in Linlithgow as it is quicker than driving from the “Brig”. I have been doing this for years and never had a problem.

As for liability, why should a motorist have to prove he/she has not been negligent.

Sometimes I do feel a wee bit insecure on some main roads but that’s life.

If ye dinna like the heat in the kitchen, get oot. – Yours etc.,

Robert Hislop

79, Belsyde Court

Linlithgow Bridge