Have your say on local issues

Memory lane

SIR,– School holidays spent at my great grandmother Park’s house in the High Street, Linlithgow, remain the highlight of my growing up years.

Down on the left from the Bo’ness Road, a wee close led to the courtyard; on the right lived a Mrs Swan, Gran’s house upstairs left and underneath her lifelong friend Liza Dalrymple, who took me for many a duck feeding trip to the Loch.

It was there that we learned of the tragic death of cousin David Park in a plane crash a week before his 21st birthday.

Probably going back a bit in the town’s history.

On my only return visit to Scotland, I was devastated to find that row of old houses gone, and replaced with a row of council houses, perhaps in the interests of modern conveniences?

Whatever happened to the preservation of historical buildings?

I would be very interested, however, to know what happened to two War Graves crosses which were in the long garden at the back which belonged to the Dalrymple family.

I now live in a small island in the middle of the Pacific Ocean, but memories of Linlithgow linger on.–Yours etc.,

CONNIE TELFER-SMITH

mailto:con@ninet.nf

Family name

SIR– My father, William Darrien was born in Bo’ness.

I was searching the web for ancestors when I came across your site with the 1951 event programme at Grange Primary.

My father moved to London where I (Patricia Darrien) was born in 1946.

Strangely enough, I attended St. Mary’s Primary School in London. I notice in the programme under “fairies” you list a Patricia Darrien, and a Monica Darrien at St. Mary’s. I’m assuming the St. Mary’s in your programme is in Bo’ness?

When my father passed away in 1985, my sister Margaret and I visited Bo’ness to look up our long lost cousins.

I do not recall hearing of another Patricia Darrien and did not meet, or hear of a Monica Darrien.

If you could shed any light on this I would be most grateful.

We very much enjoyed our visit to Bo’ness and found it to be unchanged from our many visits as children.

I live in the USA so my trips to Scotland are not as frequent as I would like.

I look forward to hearing from you.–Yours etc.,

PATRICIA DARRIEN MACAYEAL

c/o Charlie Archibald

info@thefairday.com

Litter control

SIR, – I noted with interest the remark in a recent Diary item regarding the “astonishing amount of rubbish” collected around the Recreation Centre and Lovers Lane in Queensferry during a clean-up by volunteers from GreenFerry and friends.

Whilst I have every admiration and respect for the work carried out by GreenFerry in clearing up other people’s litter and rubbish, my view is that this surely reiterates the desperate need for more effective litter and rubbish control and collection but equally importantly a better means of educating people, especially but not exclusively youngsters, to be more responsible when it comes to litter disposal.

It would be interesting to establish if, as a result of the actions of groups like GreenFerry throughout the City of Edinburgh, there has been a significant reduction in the workload of council employees involved in litter control and a consequent redeployment of these employees to other duties.– Yours etc.,

DAVID M. STEEL

Springfield Terrace,

South Queensferry.

Much missed

SIR,– May I through your paper express my heartfelt sorrow at the sudden death of John Constable.

Both John and Harry gave 150 per cent to the development and interests of the town.

Everyone who required their help from Crookies to Kinneil estate were never turned away or made to feel unimportant,never showing favouritism to any particular area,they gave hope and assistance to all.

They dedicated their lives to the service of the people of Bo’ness.

Wouldn’t it be a great tribute to both brothers if the un-named road in the town perhaps be named Constable Road.

Bo’ness will be a sorry place without them.–Yours etc.,

P. WARNER

by e-mail

SIR, – I am writing on behalf of Marie Curie Cancer Care to thank everyone in Edinburgh and the Lothians for their generous support of the charity’s Great Daffodil Appeal, through the street collections in February and March.

Your support has raised an amazing £65,518.32 which will help provide a better quality of life for people with cancer and other illnesses over the coming year at our hospice and at home in the local community. In South Queensferry a total of £1532.71 was raised while in Linlithgow, £1328.91 was collected, both over two days. In Bo’ness, £313 was raised in just two hours.

For more information about Marie Curie Cancer Care, please see below, visit www.mariecurie.org.uk or call Fiona Bushby on 0131 470 2290. – Yours etc.,

FIONA BUSHBY

Community Fundraising Manager

A Blue ‘do’

SIR,– I am appealing to all animal lovers to join me in supporting The Blue Cross Tea Party, a nationwide fundraising event to help raise money for animals in need.

My cocker spaniel George and my cat Wilson mean the world to me and they are lucky that we are able to provide the care they need. But not all pets are as lucky as they are.

Every year, this wonderful charity takes in thousands of unwanted and abandoned pets and horses and gives them a second chance in loving new homes. And its hospitals care for sick and injured animals who would otherwise go untreated.

But they rely on donations from the public to provide this vital care for our nation’s pets. You can help by taking part in The Blue Cross Tea Party.

We all love a cup of tea and a piece of cake so why not hold a tea party for family, friends or work colleagues and ask for donations for the charity? It’s a great excuse to get baking and rustle up some cakes or biscuits for a worthy cause.

All the funds raised will help The Blue Cross care for animals with nowhere else to turn, and every penny really does count.

So go on, put the kettle on and sign up now at bluecrossteaparty.org.uk or phone 08444 993 663.–Yours etc.,

FELICITY KENDAL.

The Blue Cross Animal Charity.

Sir,– Regarding your article on residents being inconvenienced by commuters parking near their homes, there are two obvious options here. 1. From what I can recollect, one way of keeping their private space clear of commuter cars is for house owners to arrange for their respective kerbs to be lowered and have a white line drawn along the edge of the road adjacent to the lowered kerb as cars cannot park alongside lowered kerbs; and 2. The derelict area just along the Edinburgh Road which not long ago used to be occupied by several retail outlets and a petrol Service station would be the ideal location for a car park - two tier? I appreciate this ground may be ear-marked for housing development, but surely the Council must at some point have had the option of buying this ground!

And yes, more signage would obviously help in the short term. – Yours etc.,

NAME AND ADDRESS SUPPLIED.

Sir, – Regarding your front page article ’Waste of Space’, it seems to be the concensus everywhere that something that is going to benefit people does not end up being as great as it seems.

The attitude with some motorists appears to say “why bother walking when we can park in streets close by.”

It is true to say that restrictions should be made in these nearby streets to the train station, so that householders can have access to their homes.It surely makes good sense does it not.

On the other hand, the council should erect more visible signs for the new car park because it is a disgrace that so much money was spent setting it up in the first place.

This seems to be the norm nowadays that things being done for the benefit of motorists, do not always fulfil their potential because it has not been thought through properly to the end result, which in my view and no doubt others is that if you want people to know where anything is, you let them know by appropriate signage throughout the town.

It’s not rocket science,just commonsense.

The area close to the train station and around has always been a bane for overparking and cluttering of streets but isn’t it just the same throughout Linlithgow as a whole.

Worse still is the fact that in some areas you cannot even walk on pavements because of vehicles parked on them.

This seems to be the norm of society and until something is done to educate drivers that everyone has the right to walk safely about their business, I guess this will always be the case especially where they cannot even walk a short distance from their cars to a designated car park.

I would gladly swop places with them and they can have my arthritis any day.

Then they would maybe appreciate how lucky they are to have cars and the ability to walk.

I can but dream.– Yours etc.,

MRS LORNA JOHNSTON

Preston Road,

Linlithgow.

Sir, – I hate to say I told you so but I’ve been saying for years that Linlithgow doesn’t necessarily need a greater quantity of parking. A better use of the parking we’ve already got could go a long way towards solving the town’s parking problems.

At certain times of day during the working week there are over 500 spaces available thoughout the town (I’ve counted them). The Council currently uses only three simple tools from its parking-restrictions tool-kit - a pay and display car park at the Vennel (franchised to Town and Country Parking), some 30-minute restrictions on the High Street and a few areas of double yellow lines. None of these are enforced rigorously and everything else is a free-for-all. This is the standard ‘small town’ strategy, unchanged since the 1960s. It simply does not suit the specific needs of Linlithgow today. So much more could,and should, be done.

How about parking permits for High Street businesses? Parking permits for residents? Parking restrictions that vary thoughout the day including a loading/unloading time for High Street businesses and two hours free parking in the town centre for afternoon shoppers, or lunchtime visitors? Where’s the (covered) cycle park? Where’s the motorcycle parking bay? Where’s the coach park?

How about some signs on the Vennel car park informing visitors that if they want to do justice to the Palace and the Peel and then browse the High Street and relax in a cafe, they’ll need to park for at least four hours, preferably longer? How about a pay-as-you-leave strategy instead of a pay-as-you-arrive strategy, so that vistors and shoppers feel happy to stay longer if they are enjoying their visit?

There is currently unlimited parking at Sainsbury’s and Aldi, two hours free parking at Tesco and a 30 minute restriction on the High Street. Under this regime is it any wonder that the High Street shops are struggling to compete? Why not offer four hours free parking at the Vennel (or on the High Street) coupled with pay-and-display at the supermarkets? Then we would see how the balance of power changes!

How about introducing a scheme for vistors to get their parking costs refunded if they visit five High Street shops in one day? This kind of incentive could be funded by a Linlithgow BIDS scheme. A BIDS scheme could take over the franchise on the Vennel car park next time it comes up for review and run it as a not-for-profit venture, for the benefit of the town.

These are just a few of the innovative ideas that could make Linlithgow’s parking work better. I’m sure your readers can come up with even more ideas that suit Linlithgow better than the current archaic strategy. Readers travelling abroad this summer should keep an eye out for some of the innovative parking strategies being used by our European neighbours, including underground coach parks and roads that are pedetrianised for some parts of the day. Just asking for more parking isn’t the magic solution that some might have expected as clearly demonstarted by your front page article. Surely there are better, cheaper, more effective ways to improve the town’s car parking for everyone.–Yours etc.,

JON NEWEY

Vice Chair, Linlithgow Business Association

Sir,– May I through your paper express my heartfelt sorrow at the sudden death of John Constable.

Both John and Harry gave 150 per cent to the development and interests of the town. Everyone who required their help from Crookies to Kinneil estate were never turned away or made feel unimportant,never showing favouritism to any particular area,they gave hope and assistance to all. They dedicated their lives to the service of the people of Bo’ness.

Wouldn’t it be a great tribute to both brothers if the un-named road in the town perhaps be named Constable Road.

Bo’ness will be a sorry place without them.–Yours etc.,

P. WARNER

by e-mail