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Bo’ness sea defences under attack

Decay in Bo'ness (Grangepans) sea defences after just six years

Decay in Bo'ness (Grangepans) sea defences after just six years

  • by By Allan Scott Chief reporter editorial@journalandgazette.co.uk
 

Recently completed Bo’ness flood defences, installed at considerable cost, are already falling victim to the elements.

Regular Journal and Gazette contributor Paul Shave brought the situation to our attention.

He was critical of the fact that, after just six years, the works appeared to be decaying rapidly when concrete poured pre-World War 2, is still fit for purpose.

Paul said: ‘‘The concrete flood defence sea wall at Grangepans has been showing signs of deterioration.

‘‘Concrete has been cracking, exposing steel reinforcement to the weather and voids have been revealed in the structure.’’

‘‘Rusting ferrous inclusions in the mix have been breaking up the surface and expansion joints need re-making. Second World War concrete poured 70 years ago has lasted better than this.

‘‘One hopes the quality assurance of workmanship and materials in the Clackmannanshire Bridge and the Queensferry Crossing are of a higher order!

‘‘Repairs are in progress. Defective concrete is being drilled away, new steel reinforcement is being incorporated and fresh concrete poured. Expansion joints are being cut out and remade.

‘‘The questions are, who let the contractor get away with this quality of work and who is paying the bill for remediation so soon after construction?

‘‘Issues like this were once meat for discussion at the Bo’ness and Blackness Area Forum. Falkirk Council having withdrawn support for it, the Journal and Gazette is now the forum for this debate’’.

A spokesman for Falkirk Council said: “Following routine inspections, we are aware of a number of minor flaws and structural issues with the flood defences in Bo’ness.

‘‘We will repair these and the costs passed on to the original contractor who carried out the design and construction work.

‘‘The repair works we are currently undertaking are not emergency works but it is important to rectify these faults now.’’

Regular Journal and Gazette contributor Paul Shave brought the situation to our attention.

He was critical of the fact that, after just six years, the works appeared to be decaying rapidly when concrete poured pre-World War 2, is still fit for purpose.

Paul said: ‘‘The concrete flood defence sea wall at Grangepans has been showing signs of deterioration.

‘‘Concrete has been cracking, exposing steel reinforcement to the weather and voids have been revealed in the structure.’’

‘‘Rusting ferrous inclusions in the mix have been breaking up the surface and expansion joints need re-making. Second World War concrete poured 70 years ago has lasted better than this.

‘‘One hopes the quality assurance of workmanship and materials in the Clackmannanshire Bridge and the Queensferry Crossing are of a higher order!

‘‘Repairs are in progress. Defective concrete is being drilled away, new steel reinforcement is being incorporated and fresh concrete poured. Expansion joints are being cut out and remade.

‘‘The questions are, who let the contractor get away with this quality of work and who is paying the bill for remediation so soon after construction?

‘‘Issues like this were once meat for discussion at the Bo’ness and Blackness Area Forum. Falkirk Council having withdrawn support for it, the Journal and Gazette is now the forum for this debate’’.

 

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