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170212 Unceiling of information board at linlithgow train station, l-r, Dr Johm McGregor, John Yellowlees, Leo DeFeu, John Aitken and Harry Knox.
170212 Unceiling of information board at linlithgow train station, l-r, Dr Johm McGregor, John Yellowlees, Leo DeFeu, John Aitken and Harry Knox.

A NEW information panel at Linlithgow Train Station claiming it was the first in the world to be photographed has been unveiled.

The famous photograph was taken in 1845 by Scottish painter David Octavius Hill, who pioneered many aspects of the art form with the engineer and photographer Robert Adamson. It is believed that Hill took the photograph of Linlithgow Station three years after it opened, as the basis for a painting. Almost 170 years later, the image he captured remains recognisable, with St Michael’s Parish Church prominent in the background.

It has now been reproduced for locals and tourists in the new Linlithgow Heritage Trail information panel, by permission of the National Gallery of Scotland.

John Aitken, chairman of the Linlithgow Civic Trust, said: “Since Victorian times the Edinburgh-Glasgow railway line has been, and continues to be, of prime importance in Linlithgow’s development. We are delighted that this panel, part of Linlithgow Heritage Trail, highlights the station’s rightful place in history.”

The panel also celebrates recent additions to the station including Mary Louise Colouris’ mural of the annual Marches procession, an impressive display of flower tiles made by local schoolchildren, and three banners produced by embroiderers from St Michael’s Parish Church.

John Yellowlees, ScotRail external relations manager, said: “We were pleased to support this venture as part of our support for the Civic Trust’s ‘Burgh Beautiful’ campaign. That campaign includes ‘adopting’ Linlithgow Station, with volunteers planting and maintaining beautiful barrels of flowers on both platforms.”

The panel has been developed jointly by Linlithgow Civic Trust, Pride and Passion Linlithgow, and Linlithgow Heritage Trust, with support from ScotRail, the train operator, and West Lothian Council.