WATCH: Nearly there – gap narrows on Forth Crossing deck

Infrastructure Minister Keith Brown with Jared Carlson and Jennifer Bullingham, engineers who have worked on the launch of the Queensferry Crossing's north approach viaduct.
Infrastructure Minister Keith Brown with Jared Carlson and Jennifer Bullingham, engineers who have worked on the launch of the Queensferry Crossing's north approach viaduct.
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Another significant milestone for the Queensferry Crossing saw the 5600 tonne north approach viaduct being fully launched.

Engineers have completed the hugely complex process
of pushing the massive 
viaduct out across the 
Queensferry Crossing’s 
distinctive v-shaped piers on the north side of the Forth.

Unlike the south viaduct which was constructed in sections, the north viaduct, which is over 220 metres long, was fully assembled on site and pushed out over 
static temporary supports 
as a single operation

A distance of only 64
metres now lies between 
making the connection from the north viaduct to the north deck fan.

Visiting the Forth Replacement Crossing to view the 
latest progress and speak 
with some of those involved 
in the operation, Cabinet 
Secretary for Infrastructure Keith Brown said: “If any 
further evidence is required to demonstrate large scale, world class engineering, look no 
further than the latest progress on the Queensferry Crossing.

“Pushing such a huge 
structure in such a controlled manner, working to a tolerance of a few millimetres, requires expert planning and execution. It is clear that highly skilled and experienced engineers are bringing their knowledge to the project, while others are taking the opportunity to gather their experience. This level of expertise is helping to ensure the project remains on schedule to have traffic on the bridge this 
December.”

Michael Martin, project director for the consortium building the new bridge, Forth Crossing Bridge Constructors, said: “The launch of the North Approach Viaduct into its final position has been one of the most technically challenging operations of its type ever 
performed.

“A massive total of 6300 tonnes of steel and concrete was launched out 230 metres, in itself a significant feat of 
engineering.