Bo’ness grandfather still running for charity

Edward Hughes, David Thornton - Cancer Research, Linlithgow shop manager - and and Edward's grandaughter Rosie Hughes, displaying her medal for the Great Scottish Run which she ran in September.
Edward Hughes, David Thornton - Cancer Research, Linlithgow shop manager - and and Edward's grandaughter Rosie Hughes, displaying her medal for the Great Scottish Run which she ran in September.

A fundraising grandfather from Bo’ness hopes to break the £50,000 mark in 2020, his 10th year of helping good causes by running.

Eddie Hughes (60) has raised £47, 618 through his nine years of doing fundraising runs, with £6,000 raised this year.

He said: “I ran the Liverpool marathon in May this year, my eighth marathon. I’ve also ran about 10 half marathons.

“I run in memory of my sister in law Moira Kirkham, who died of breast cancer, aged 44, and Violet Davidson, who died of cancer. She is the mother of Bob Grant, who has been doing the fundraising with me for the past four or five years.

“This year’s money will be split between Breast Cancer Now and Edinburgh Sick Kids intensive care unit as my grand daughter Rosie was cared for there. She was born 10 weeks premature in 2014, weighing 2lbs 10oz.

“I would like to thank all my family and friends who have also sponsored me over the years. It’s very much appreciated . I would like to wish them all a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year.

“I would also like to thank all my sponsors over the years, particularly Paul Hutchison at Bellsburn Motors, James Bailey Trading, Marilynn McLucas at Heeps Tansport and Diane Paterson at Eccosse Automotive.”

So why is Eddie so determined to carry on funrasing into his 60s? “It keeps me fit, and I don’t want to stop now, I want to get to £50,000 at least next year”, he said.

“That would be a great way to mark a decade of doing this.

“The reason I got started with the running was my wife was doing a 10k run and I was going along just to take photos. But her sister never did it as planned so I took her place.

“I said ‘never again’ after that first run. But that was about 13 years ago and I’ve been running ever since.

“I decided to do it again, just 10ks, but not fundraising. Then I realised I could maybe raise money for good causes.

“The half marathon was the start of the fundraisers. Everybody knows me now at these runs.

“My first fundraising run raised £928 for Alzheimer’s. Now I can raise about £4,000 a time. I ran for Cancer Research for about five years. Now I run for Breast Cancer and the Sick Kids. It’s all been worth it.”