Unpaid team raises money

Pictured second from left is AMIS Service Manager Iris Quar with West Lothian Council staff left to right, Unpaid Work Supervisor Davie Jeffery, Group Manager for Criminal and Youth Justice Service Gillian Oghene and Unpaid Work Case Manager Lisa Lind.
Pictured second from left is AMIS Service Manager Iris Quar with West Lothian Council staff left to right, Unpaid Work Supervisor Davie Jeffery, Group Manager for Criminal and Youth Justice Service Gillian Oghene and Unpaid Work Case Manager Lisa Lind.

Money raised by West Lothian Council’s Community Payback unpaid work order scheme is helping support local men who have experienced domestic abuse.

The council’s Unpaid Work team has donated £1,000 to the Abused Men in Scotland (AMIS) charity, which was set up in 2010 to support men who were subject to domestic abuse.

Many people given a Community Payback Order (CPO) by the courts take part in unpaid work as part of their community sentence.

One of the projects they undertake involves repairing bikes which are then passed onto local charities, and any bikes which cannot be repaired are then sent to scrap to redeem the value of the metal, which generates money for local good causes.

Executive councillor for social policy Angela Doran said: “I am delighted to see the Community Payback Unpaid Work scheme is helping give back to the community. As well as local charities benefiting from free refurbished bikes, the money from scrap metal is now helping local good causes, with those with a CPO helping choose the charities to benefit.”

AMIS service manager Iris Quar, who accepted the cheque on behalf of her organisation, said: “AMIS is delighted to receive such a generous donation from a scheme which, in its self, delivers such positive benefits to the local community in West Lothian.

“This will help us to maintain our support services and bring hope to domestic abuse experienced men in Scotland.

“Thank you from all at AMIS and on behalf of the men it will help.”

Community Payback is a community sentence which can be imposed by Scottish courts, which requires anyone given a CPO to give back to their local community. This is supported by targeted intervention programmes to address the issues that led to the CPO.

Previous donations from the scheme include charities such as West Lothian Women’s Aid (WLWA), who support local woman and children affected by domestic abuse, and Dignity Boxes, who provided toiletries for those unable to buy their own.