New ‘icon’ Queensferry Crossing is a design great for Scotland

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The Forth Replacement Crossing project has won the Greatest Contribution to Scotland award at this year’s Saltire Infrastructure Awards.

The judges recognised its importance in creating resilience in Scotland’s transport network and the professional excellence displayed in all aspects of its design and construction.

The longest three-tower cable bridge in the world has several ‘firsts’, including the world’s longest continuous underwater concrete pour and longest free-standing cantilevers.

The annual awards recognise excellence and innovation in civil engineering and celebrate its contribution to quality of life. This year, it attracted 12 entries.

Kate Forbes MSP, Minister for Public Finance and Digital Economy, presented the awards during a ceremony at the National Museum of Scotland in Edinburgh.

She said: “I am, of course, delighted that the newest Scottish icon, the Queensferry Crossing, has been recognised for its contribution to Scotland.

“It is delivering extensive benefits to users and communities whilst safeguarding vital transport connections, helping families and businesses right across the country.”

Glasgow’s Shieldhall Tunnel earned the Infrastructure award. It is the largest storm water storage tunnel in Scotland, designed to end the city’s uncontrolled flooding issues.

Professor Sally Mapstone, president of the Saltire Society, said: “Civil engineers design, build and maintain the vital infrastructure on which our quality of life depends and these projects show Scotland at its best.

“The Saltire Society celebrates the Scottish imagination and talent and nowhere is this more evident than in the ‘art and science’ of civil engineering.”